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Opinion

How to build a Middle Income Zimbabwe by 2030

By Farai Charasika – As Zimbabwe enters into election season, the country will need leadership that can articulate and demonstrate that they will decisively move the country towards socio-economic recovery, growth & prosperity. Regardless of the winner, the incoming administration will need to address a number of initiatives that will set the country on an aggressive growth trajectory. To become a middle income country (estimated $35-45 billion GDP) will require a strong >8-10% GDP growth per year. To achieve this requires visionary leadership, management expertise, relentless execution and the will of all stakeholders to move Zimbabwe forward on this bold journey. To move the country into its “promised land” and rebuild the economy into a holistic and inclusive middle income countr...

Zimbabwe’s externalised millions: a perspective

By Matt. E.T Matigari, March 29 (The Source) – On 28 November 2017, days after his inauguration as President of the Republic, Emmerson Mnangagwa announced a three months long amnesty window for the return of funds illegally kept abroad by individuals and companies. “Those affected are thus encouraged to take advantage of the three-month moratorium to return the illegally externalized funds and assets in order to avoid the pain and ignominy of being visited by the long arm of the law,” his proclamation said. At that point, it is clear that Mnangagwa intended to show that he had a different, no-longer-business-as-usual approach. Months later, a long list of one thousand eight hundred companies and individuals alleged to have externalized over $800 million was published. This move elicited bo...

The first 100 days of selling hope (and not much else)

HARARE, March 7 (The Source) – Zimbabwe’s (newish) President Emmerson Mnangagwa is a pragmatist, or he should be. Which makes the 100-day plan of action so out of line because it is a mammoth task to bring back any semblance of normalcy to the country’s economy. It may be that ED, as his followers love to  call him, loves the command model so much he was blind to the reality that it will be impossible to make significant strides in addressing the shortcomings hobbling Zimbabwe’s economy until after the election, if they are free and fair as the international community has made clear. As a political gimmick, he opened himself up to ridicule by opponents and civil society alike. So, was he selling hope? Perhaps. Mnangagwa inherited a receding economy with foreign investors fleeing in numbers...